Premier Nursery Southport Ofsted Report 2008 & Ainsdale Ofsted Report 2007

The Ofsted reports from previous years can be accessed from our links page.

Premier Nursery Southport Ofsted Report 2008

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE AND NURSERY EDUCATION

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are good. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.

The quality and standards of the nursery education are good.

WHAT SORT OF SETTING IS IT?

The Premier Nursery Education Centre was registered in 1997 and is privately owned and managed. The nursery is situated within converted chapel buildings in the Norwood and Meols Cop area of Southport. There is a large enclosed area for outdoor play.

The setting is open from 08.00 to 18.00 each weekday, all year-round with the exception of public holidays. The setting is registered to care for a maximum of 46 children aged from birth to under five years. There are currently 62 children on roll of whom 18 receive funding for nursery education.

There are currently 11 staff employed, all holding appropriate qualifications or working towards one. The nursery receives support from an early year’s advisory teacher.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROVISION

Helping children to be healthy

The provision is good. Children are cared for in a clean well-maintained environment where they learn the importance of good hygiene. For example, children know that germs on their hands will make them ill. Photographs displayed above the sink areas demonstrate how to wash their hands properly. Children independently wipe their own noses and dispose of tissues in a bin. Staff minimise the spread of infection by wearing aprons and gloves during nappy changing, making sure the area is fully cleansed after each child. Children in the baby room are further protected as overshoes are provided for visitors and staff wear slippers, so that the floor does not become contaminated. Children are well taken care of if they have an accident, as all are recorded and signed by parents to ensure they are informed. Bottles are prepared for babies as required and suitable sterilisation equipment is used for babies' feeding utensils and dummies.

Children develop a positive attitude towards healthy eating because they are provided with nutritious balanced meals and snacks. They particularly enjoy a selection of fresh fruit during the morning, and broccoli and cheese bake in a cream sauce at lunchtime. Children gain independence as they lay the tables for lunch, complete with flowers and serve themselves. All children have access to fresh drinking water, helping them to learn healthy habits for the future.

Children have many opportunities to enjoy fresh air and take part in physical activities. They learn about the importance of a healthy lifestyle through keep fit sessions where they pretend to be a runner bean or a broad bean. They negotiate an obstacle course climbing over, under and through apparatus. Staff ensure that most activities are not confined to indoors and children enjoy playing with water, digging in soil and painting their masterpieces in the garden.

Protecting children from harm or neglect and helping them stay safe

The provision is satisfactory. Children are cared for in a clean, safe environment. The use of the outside play area extends the children's learning environment effectively. Their artwork is attractively displayed around the walls, giving them a sense of pride and belonging. There are adequate nappy changing facilities. However, children's personal care needs are not addressed discreetly as there are no doors on the toilet cubicles. This does not respect children's dignity or privacy. During the inspection, the outdoor temperature is very cold. The indoor temperature does not meet the minimum requirement. Therefore, this does not promote children's comfort whilst playing, particularly children who are not mobile.

Children use a good range of safe, well-maintained toys and equipment suitable to the age and stage of their development. These are stored at low level to develop independence. The playrooms are very well laid out, particularly the schoolroom. For example, children have access to a large floor sandpit in which to play, a cosy book corner where they can select their own reading materials and a cafe snack system where they can enjoy fresh fruit when they choose.

Children stay safe and secure through the effective use of relevant procedures by staff. For example, the close supervision of visitors and the very good security measures in place. Staff are vigilant and responsive to hazards, such as spilt sand which is quickly swept up from the floor to prevent slipping. There are clearly defined procedures to evacuate the building in an emergency. These are practised regularly so that children know what to expect. They learn the importance of keeping themselves safe as outside visitors come in and talk to them about road safety.

Children are well protected by staff who are confident and secure in their knowledge of child protection policies and procedures. Staff understand their role in identifying, sharing and recording any concerns they may have. They know how to take necessary action, if they should be concerned. This safeguards children's well-being.

Helping children achieve well and enjoy what they do

The provision is good. Throughout the nursery, staff and children build close, warm relationships with each other. Staff provide a calm, consistent environment where children are generally happy and settled. Good procedures help new children to settle in. They build good relationships with their peers. Their self-esteem is well developed as they receive regular praise for their efforts. The rooms are divided into areas of play with resources available at child height. This enables children to make their own choices about what they would like to do. For instance, in the baby room children play with gloop, squeezing it between their fingers. They explore treasure baskets and play posting a small toy through a letterbox, causing intrigue. Children in the toddler room enjoy outdoor play including painting, riding on wheeled toys and chasing balls around the garden. Pre-school children have fun baking cakes, sharing their news from the weekend and engaging in a music and movement session that is much enjoyed by all.

Their key worker carefully monitors children under three and individual planning ensures that their

development is maximised. Staff meet regularly to discuss the progress of each child. Children make independent choices about their play and staff ensure they are purposefully occupied throughout the day.

Nursery education

The quality of teaching and learning is good. Children's learning is significantly enhanced because most staff have a very good understanding of the Foundation Stage and how children learn. Activities are planned and clearly linked to the stepping-stones. As a result, children are making very good progress in their learning. Staff put into practice a well-planned programme of interesting activities that cover all areas of learning, both in and outdoors. Rigorous observation and assessment of children's activities are recorded, clearly showing the next steps for their development. The observations used inform planning which builds around children's interests. Most staff are clear about the learning intentions of activities and use good questioning skills to extend children's thought processes. However, some staff are unclear about the purpose of activities meaning children's learning is not maximised.

Children are keen to start playing once they arrive and independently choose different activities to play with. Children are confident and independent in the management of their self-care skills. They blow their own noses, wash their hands and put their own coats on. Listening skills are developing well. For instance, they follow simple instructions from staff and listen very well during story sessions. They enjoy sharing their news and know they have to wait until they are holding the pebble, before it is their turn to speak. Children are developing early reading skills as they recognise their own name cards at self-registration and their named place mats at mealtimes. They are confident in expressing their needs and feelings, and staff use effective language to support children's thinking.

Children are learning to count in everyday situations and routines. They respond positively to number rhymes and practise counting with support from staff. Activities reflect a variety of opportunities for children to sort, match, count and understand shapes around them. Children count from one to 10 with confidence and some are able to recognise and name numbers under 10, written in books, on puzzles and on the computer keyboard. They use simple mathematical language, such as big, little, long, full and heavy correctly during their play.

Children are encouraged to explore and investigate. They plant cress seeds and monitor their growth. They grow runner beans, carrots, radishes and tomatoes. They mix two colours of paint and predict the new colour. A computer is available for daily use so that children can learn about technology. They use the mouse competently and can work through appropriate programmes to support their understanding of colour, shape, number and letter independently. Children learn about the concepts of building and joining materials together as they play with construction bricks. They learn about other cultures and beliefs, listen to the story of Chinese New Year and discuss their favourite parts of the story. They go on train journeys to the pinewoods, to watch the squirrels. Trips to local parks allow them to kick through the leaves. They have picnics on the beach and make dens in cardboard boxes in the nursery garden.

Children take part in plenty of physical exercise as they learn to take care of their bodies. They run about outside to keep warm and stretch their arms and legs. They develop a sense of space as they walk backwards and sideways, following instruction. They enjoy doing the 'sticky kids work out' to music and use a variety of apparatus for climbing, balancing, slithering and sliding. Children's hand-eye coordination is developed as they use scissors, glue spreaders, paintbrushes and pencils. They are able to express themselves creatively through a variety of activities and media. They describe gloop as being like Spiderman 'goo' and pretend to shoot their webs upwards towards the ceiling. They design their own cards and make 3-D models for Chinese New Year. Children enjoy playing musical instruments and experiment with rhythms and sound. They particularly enjoy imaginative play and the well-equipped home corner provides hours of fun and learning.

Helping children make a positive contribution

The provision is good. The children are made to feel very welcome to the nursery where they are very happy and secure and make a positive contribution. For example, by helping to tidy up and be independent with putting on coats for outdoor play. Children's individual needs are well met. They are all included and staff clearly value their individuality. They are encouraged to recycle and compost nursery waste, helping to raise their awareness of the local environment and the natural world. They celebrate different festivals to encourage children's learning. However, their awareness of cultural diversity is not maximised as resources and positive images which promote this are limited. Staff ensure children have equal access to all activities regardless of their ability, gender or background. They work well with other agencies to ensure that children's opportunities are maximised.

Children's behaviour is very good. They are encouraged to be kind, caring and considerate to others through ongoing discussions and practice within the setting. Staff are calm and consistent in their approach to behaviour management. They use timely interventions where they use distraction or clear instruction, which protects the child. Positive behaviour is encouraged through praise that develops children's self-esteem and confidence. Staff have high expectation of children's behaviour and present themselves as good role models. Children's spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is fostered.

Partnership with parents and carers is satisfactory. They receive written information about the service provided and have access to the policies and procedures. The registration certificate is displayed for their information and all parents and carers can view a copy of the inspection report. Parents are provided with general information about childcare in both reception areas and via a newsletter. Children benefit from the informal contact between their parents and staff. Staff state that daily discussions are held with parent's to keep them informed about their child's day. However, opportunities for parents to become involved in their children's learning and systems in place do not ensure that parents have sufficient knowledge about the Foundation Stage of learning. Parents are pleased with the care of their children, they say that staff are very approachable.

Organisation

The organisation is good. A well-qualified staff team cares for children. The setting places a high priority on staff development and training. Staff working directly with children in receipt of funding for early education are knowledgeable of the curriculum guidance for the Foundation Stage and use it very well. Those working with children under three make very good use of the 'Birth to three matters' framework to support their practice. A rigorous induction procedure ensures that staff gain knowledge of the basic working practices of the nursery very quickly. The staff understand and follow the setting’s policies and procedures to protect children, promote their well-being and support all children to develop their potential.

The leadership and management of the nursery education are good. Team working is effective as staff are clear about their individual roles and responsibilities. There is a good ratio of staff to children, which enables staff to give effective support and encouragement. The management structure works well to lead, motivate and manage the provision. The providers are able to identify the setting's strengths and weaknesses. Good systems are in place to monitor the process of teaching and learning, ensuring that children progress through the stepping-stones, towards the early learning goals. Overall, the provision meets the needs of the range of the children for whom it provides.

Improvements since the last inspection

At the last care inspection, the provider was asked to revise induction and appraisal systems. New procedures have been written to ensure that staff have full understanding of the policies and procedures and are able to implement them effectively.

At the last nursery education inspection, the provider was asked to provide more opportunities for children to learn about health and bodily awareness and to provide more opportunities for children to use their emerging mathematical knowledge. Planning has been developed to incorporate topics about health. Children are very confident in hand washing independently and regularly take part in physical exercise. They recognise changes to the body and can independently help themselves to water when they are thirsty, for example, after exercise. Children regularly take part in mathematical activities. They enjoy simple problem solving, such as subtracting how many men in a flying saucer are left when one has flown away.

They were also asked to improve the way some staff interact with children. Some staff are not as skilled as others and are not confident in questioning and challenging children to extend their learning. They are not clear about the intended learning outcomes. This recommendation remains an area for improvement.

Complaints since the last inspection

Since the last inspection, there have been no complaints made to Ofsted that required the provider or Ofsted to take any action in order to meet the National Standards.

The provider is required to keep a record of complaints made by parents, which they can see on request. The complaints record may contain complaints other than those made to Ofsted.

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE AND NURSERY EDUCATION

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are good. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.

The quality and standards of the nursery education are good.

WHAT MUST BE DONE TO SECURE FUTURE IMPROVEMENT?

The quality and standards of the care

To improve the quality and standards of care further the registered person should take account of the following recommendation(s):

  • ensure the dignity and privacy of children using the toilet area; ensure minimum temperature requirements are maintained throughout the nursery
  • extend the range of toys and resources to promote positive images of a diverse society.

The quality and standards of the nursery education

To improve the quality and standards of nursery education further the registered person should take account of the following recommendation(s):

  • ensure all staff are clear about the learning outcomes for the activities provided, so that learning is effectively developed
  • improve the quality and accessibility of information given to parents about the curriculum and how it links to the progress their children are making towards the early learning goals.

Premier Nursery Aindale Ofsted Report 2007

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE AND NURSERY EDUCATION

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are satisfactory. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.

The quality and standards of the nursery education are good.

WHAT SORT OF SETTING IS IT?

Premier Nursery Education Centre opened in 2001. The nursery is one of two settings owned by a private provider. It operates from three ground floor and two first floor rooms in a large detached building. It is situated in a residential area of Ainsdale, Southport. Children have access to a fully enclosed outdoor play area. A maximum of 47 children may attend the nursery at any one time. The nursery is open each weekday, except bank holidays, from 08.00 to 18.00.

There are currently 71 children aged under eight years on roll. This includes 16 children who receive funding for early education. The nursery is currently supporting a number of children with learning difficulties or disabilities.

The nursery employs 12 staff to work with the children. All of the staff hold appropriate early years qualifications. Two members of staff hold a BA in Education. One member of the staff is working towards a foundation degree and two staff are working towards level 3 qualifications. The setting receives support from Sure Start.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROVISION

Helping children to be healthy

The provision is satisfactory. Children are cared for in a clean and hygienic environment. Children develop a secure understanding of the need for good hygiene practices through discussions and practical demonstrations by staff. This means they are confident to wash their hands after messy activities, before meals and after going to the bathroom. Younger children are pleased to demonstrate to staff that their hands are ‘all clean now', as they present them for inspection. Staff are positive role models who consistently wash their hands at appropriate times and wear appropriate aprons and gloves when changing children or serving food. This enhances the children's health and well-being. Goods systems are in place to ensure pets do not pose a risk to children's health. Older children are confident to see to their own personal needs, as they independently access the bathroom areas.

Most staff are trained in first aid. This means children's accidents or incidents are handled well and children receive good care and support. This is further supported by the sick child policy, which ensures children receive appropriate care if they become unwell at the setting. A medication policy is in place, however, the systems for obtaining blanket consent for the administration of medication is not appropriate. Staff are not accurately recording the type of medication administered to children and often refer to this as prescribed medicine. This does not promote children's health and well-being and is a breach of the National Standards. Children are able to sleep or rest according to their individual needs, with all bedding laundered regularly to prevent the risk of cross infection.

Children’s physical development is progressing well. Children are confident to use a range of wheeled and climbing resources outdoors. They enthusiastically 'whiz' around the outdoor area on bicycles and negotiate obstacles, such as traffic cones well. There is currently no specific planning in place for outdoor play. This means some opportunities to enhance children's learning and physical development outdoors, are missed with older or more able children not being sufficiently challenged. Younger children are confident to practise their walking and balancing skills indoors as they confidently pull themselves up on furniture. Children are using small resources with increasing control, for example, they carefully cut up dough with scissors and use cutlery appropriately.

Children enjoy a wide range of healthy and nutritious meals and snacks. All are freshly prepared by the cook on a daily basis who effectively sources local produce to ensure fruit and vegetables are as fresh as possible. Meals include home-made soups, casseroles and roast dinners, all of which are very well received by the children. Meals are prepared to take into account the children's individual needs, preferences and dietary requirements. Meals for babies are appropriately blended in order to meet their developmental needs. Good systems are in place for the preparation of babies' feeds and all babies are held whilst having a bottle. Mealtimes are a very relaxed social occasion. Children are encouraged to serve themselves and to try new foods. Staff sit with the children to eat, which significantly enhances the social aspects of mealtimes. All children have independent access to fresh drinking water in order to keep themselves refreshed.

Protecting children from harm or neglect and helping them stay safe

The provision is satisfactory. Children are cared for in a well organised warm, welcoming environment. Rooms are set up into many different play areas, which support children's learning and independence. Children are confident to explore the areas within their rooms and to self-select their own resources. This is further enhanced by the wide range of low-level storage systems in all rooms. There is an appropriate selection of child sized furniture, tables and chairs, for children to use. Children have access to a wide range of good quality books, toys and resources, which are safe, suitable and support their learning and development. Children’s art work is displayed with pride around the setting; this successfully supports and enhances their self-esteem and sense of belonging.

Most risks have been identified and minimised. Risk assessments are in place, however, there are no monitoring systems in place to ensure these remain valid and some timescales set to monitor risks are not appropriate and pose a risk to children's safety. Good security systems are in place, which enhance children's safety; this includes key pads on internal doors and the requirement of all visitors to sign in and out of the building. Appropriate fire evacuation systems are in place and fire detection equipment is checked on a regular basis. The practice of children on the first floor using the fire escape to access the outdoor play area has enhanced their safety, as they are familiar with the structure. This means they are able to evacuate safely in an emergency. Children are developing an understanding of their own safety and those of their friends. They are confident to remind others to hold the rail when going up and down stairs and understand the need not to run indoors. Appropriate systems are in place for taking children on outings in the local community. Staff talk to the children about road safety and how to be safe outdoors, which again enhances their understanding of how to keep themselves safe.

Staff have a sound understanding of child protection. A number of staff including the named person for child protection have attended training on this subject to enhance their understanding of child protection procedures. This is supported by the child protection policy and the range of information around the nursery from the Local Safeguarding Children's Board. Staff are aware of the action to take should they have a concern about a child's welfare. However, some staff are not secure on the action to take should an allegation be made against a member of staff. Overall, the setting is able to protect children from harm.

Helping children achieve well and enjoy what they do

The provision is good. Children are happy and settled at the nursery. Most enter eagerly and are quickly absorbed in self- chosen play and learning experiences. This is supported by the warm, caring relationships the staff develop with the children to help them feel safe and secure in their care. Staff are very aware of children's individual needs and meet these well in practice. They are very supportive of children who are feeling insecure by providing words of comfort and plenty of cuddles. This enables children to settle and become engaged in play activities. The recently revised planning system means staff are now effectively planning for children's individual interests and abilities. This enhances their ongoing learning and development.

Younger children are actively engaged in self-chosen play opportunities. They enjoy exploring role play scenarios and happily make pretend meals and drinks for their friends and staff. They show concern for others as they care for their ‘babies’ and they re-enact familiar experiences. Children enjoy the company of staff and encourage them to join in the fun, such as building towers and knocking them down. This is greeted with much hilarity from children and staff. Staff use spontaneous events well to promote children's learning, for example, bringing into the nursery sheets of ice they found on the water tray. This effectively enables the children to investigate the ice and to talk about the changes as the ice melts. Staff make very good use of this activity to introduce new words to children, such as shiver, which enhances their communication and language skills. Children confidently describe what they are experiencing as they talk about the ice being cold and shiver as they handle it. They then gleefully chase staff around the room to show them how cold their hands are after handling the ice. These exchanges add to the fun elements of learning and provide good topics of conversation which enable children to explore other ideas, such as the type of clothing to wear when it is cold.

Children are keen to listen to stories and enthusiastically take part in action stories, such as 'We're going on a bear hunt'. Here they wait eagerly in anticipation for the various obstacles the family have to go through, such as the tall grass and mud. They are developing understanding of counting and shape recognition. This is supported well by the staff’s ability to ask open-ended questions, which enable younger children to think and communicate their ideas. Children are confident to explore a range of creative experiences, such as painting, dough and to investigate real and natural objects. All children receive high levels of positive interaction from all staff which enables them to make good progress in all areas of their development.

Nursery education

The quality of teaching and learning is good. Staff have a secure understanding of the Foundation Stage and how children learn. They use this well to provide a wide range of interesting learning opportunities that actively engage the children's interest. Plans are in place and have recently been revised to incorporate planning for the individual needs of the children. However, whilst providing a broad spectrum and balance of activities, the plans do not make direct links to the stepping stones and areas of learning. Staff are using observations well to identify what children know and can do and are identifying the next steps in the children's learning. However, specific future learning outcomes for children are not always sufficiently detailed or clearly linked to the planning. This means some children are not always sufficiently challenged. Having said that, the assessment records demonstrate that children are making good progress in all areas. Staff are skilled at creating environments that encourage all children to learn. For example, they have identified areas that some children do not readily access, such as the writing area and have looked at other ways to encourage them to take part in pre-writing activities. Staff are skilled at asking open-ended questions that effectively support children's thinking, communication, language and problem solving skills. They spend considerable amounts of time listening, talking and interacting with children, which helps them to make progress. Staff effectively support children's learning by providing opportunities to visit local places of interest in line with the current topic. This also include visits from other persons, such as the 'Bug man' to look at a range of insects to enhance children's understanding through real experiences.

Children are confident, interested and eager learners. They welcome the opportunities to explore new experiences, such as playing outdoors with paint rollers and brushes to paint the walls with soapy water. They play well with their peers and show concern when their friends are not yet present and welcome them enthusiastically on their arrival. They work well together, for example, one child cannot reach the dressing up outfit and asks the others for help. One child successfully retrieves the outfit and explains 'I can do it because I have big arms'. They negotiate well with one another and enjoy the opportunities to undertake small jobs with staff. Children are developing a good understanding of their own cultures and beliefs as they celebrate birthdays and other special events throughout the year.

Children are confident speakers and use language well to describe what they are doing, for example, they explain how they have made a hedgehog out of leaves and pine cones. Children self- register on arrival by placing their picture on the board. Children enjoy a print rich environment, which enables them to examine different types of text and print, such as magazines, books and labels. However, they have few opportunities to recognise their names, write for a purpose or to attempt to mark their own work. Children listen well to stories and handle books appropriately when accessing the various book areas. Children's mathematical development is progressing appropriately. Some children are able to count to five and beyond. However, they have limited opportunities to count for a purpose during everyday tasks or to solve simple problems. Children have some opportunities to explore more or less than as they sing songs, such as ‘10 little angels' and 'five speckled frogs'. They use some mathematical language in everyday conversations to describe bigger and smaller.

Children have a good understanding of everyday technology. They are becoming skilled at using computers and have good opportunities to explore other technology, such as mobile phones in role play and cassette players to listen to sounds. They learn about living and growing things as they care for their pets at nursery and grow various plants and vegetables. They are keen to investigate different areas within the garden and enjoy digging for worms. They are keen to look at them with staff, who introduce a range of descriptive language, such as 'slippery' and 'shiny' to enable children to develop their vocabulary and explain what they can see. Children build well with a range of construction kits. Children are developing a positive attitude to others as they explore different cultures and beliefs. They are very confident to talk about past events, such as the last Christmas concert and look forward to the part they are to play this year.

Children's creativity is effectively fostered by staff who provide many opportunities for children to use a wide range of media and creative materials. Children use their imagination well in role play scenarios and are keen to engage other children in their play. They enjoy the opportunities to learn new songs as they enthusiastically sing their renditions of 'Christmas is coming' and 'jingle bells'. They have weekly opportunities to explore music, rhythm and sounds with the music teacher. Children are confident to self-select additional art materials to enhance their creative masterpieces. They work well together to create collaborative paintings using various parts of their bodies.

Helping children make a positive contribution

The provision is good. Children’s needs, individual circumstances and preferences are known to staff and are effectively met in practice. Staff are very knowledgeable about the children in their care, which means all children receive good care from staff. This is supported by the information sourced from parents to support the children's care, health and learning needs. This means the nursery provides continuity of care to all children. Children's spiritual, social, moral and social development is fostered. Children have good opportunities to explore the wider world through planned activities and events, such as Diwali, Hanukah, and food tasting sessions. Children have access to a range of resources depicting diversity though this is limited for younger children. Children's understanding of their community and wider world is effectively supported by activities, such as the balloon race. Here children released balloons with a label that contained their first name and nursery contact details. This resulted in a positive response from the community and further a field. Children received replies from all over the country, Germany and Luxembourg. This has effectively supported children's learning as they are able to look at maps to find the locations and talk about the areas. Children have a good understanding of their local community as they regularly go to local libraries and shops in line with topic work. This means children are developing positive attitudes to others.

Children are well behaved. They respond well to staff's requests and are developing a good understanding of the setting's rules. Older children take turns well and have a clear picture of the need to share with others. Younger children are effectively developing these ideas through the guidance and support of staff. Staff are supportive of children and provide clear age appropriate explanations, as to why their behaviour is unacceptable. These discussions provide valuable insight to the children who are able to modify their behaviour and identify the consequences of their actions. This successfully enables children to learn right from wrong. Children are keen to undertake simple tasks, such as helping to tidy away resources or to help prepare the table for lunch. This successfully enhances their self-esteem and independence.

The setting provides very good care to children with disabilities or children who have a significant illness. Staff work very well with other agencies to ensure children with a low immune system are not exposed to infectious illnesses, such as chicken pox or measles, which could have a significant impact upon their health. The Special educational needs coordinator (Senco) is well informed and ensures good support systems are initiated by the nursery, such as individual education plans in order to support children's ongoing learning and development. The introduction of picture boards has enhanced the opportunities for children with hearing impairments of language difficulties to communicate with staff and children. This has had a positive impact upon all of the children attending the nursery as the children use this system to communicate with one another and to identify what is happening next during the day. Staff have sought guidance from specialist teachers in order to enhance the opportunities and learning for children with disabilities. This has a very positive impact upon their development.

The partnership with parents is good. Parents are well informed about their child's time at the setting and the progress they are making. This is supported by the wealth of well organised information displayed around the setting and the positive relationships the parents have with staff. This ensures effective communication systems are in place between parents and the nursery. Parents are regularly invited into the nursery to take part in 'fun days' or to see the Nativity play and Christmas concert. Consents are in place which means children are cared for in line with their parent’s wishes. Good systems are in place for sharing information with parents about their child's progress which includes informal discussions and the opportunities to look at their child's development file. Parents are encouraged to support the children's learning by bringing in items from home, such as gloves to make puppets or to come into the nursery to talk about their jobs. Parents state they are very happy with the care and education their children receive. Some comment upon their children coming on in leaps since they started, others comment upon feeling safe to leave their child with staff.

Organisation

The organisation is satisfactory. Children are cared for by qualified and experienced staff. Induction systems are in place, but do not contain information to confirm that child protection procedures are explored in the first week of employment. Monitoring systems by management for ensuring staff are fully informed of all the required elements are not effective. Staff have good opportunities to attend training courses in order to enhance their knowledge base and to improve the care and opportunities provided to children. Recent training includes, first aid, 'training tiny tearaways', Senco training, food safety and catering and the Early Years Foundation stage.

The leadership and management are good. Staff have good opportunities to attend training surrounding the Foundation Stage in order to improve upon the educative provision provided to children. Staff are committed and highly motivated. This is reflected in their enthusiasm to support children's learning and to consider new ways of working. However, there are no formal systems in place for the monitoring and evaluation of the curriculum to identify their strengths and weaknesses. Although, they have started an action plan, which outlines some future developments.

Policies and procedures which contribute to the health, safety and well-being of the children are in place and are shared well with parents. However, there are some omissions within the behaviour management policy with regards to bullying and the complaints procedure does not include the contact number of the regulator. All other records with the exception of the medication record are well maintained. Registration systems effectively record children's attendance.

Overall, the provision meets the needs of the range of the children for whom it provides.

Improvements since the last inspection

Following the last inspection three recommendations were raised in relation to the risk assessments, administration of medication and the outing's policy. The review of the medication administration recording systems has not been effective as staff are not recording the actual name of the medication administered to children. This has a negative impact upon children's well-being.

The risk assessments have been updated to include details of the potential risks of radiators, television wires and the base of the fire escape. The outing's policy has been reviewed and now reflects current practice. In addressing these issues the setting has improved upon the children's safety and well-being.

Complaints since the last inspection

Since the last inspection Ofsted received a concern in relation to National Standard 3: Care, Learning and Play, National Standard 11: Behaviour and National Standard 12: Working in Partnership with Parents and Carers. The Complaints, Investigation and Enforcement team contacted the provision. The provision provided an investigation response regarding the concerns raised. Ofsted are satisfied the provider remains qualified for registration.

The provider is required to keep a record of complaints made by parents, which they can see on request. The complaints record may contain complaints other than those made to Ofsted.

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE AND NURSERY EDUCATION

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are satisfactory. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.

The quality and standards of the nursery education are good.

WHAT MUST BE DONE TO SECURE FUTURE IMPROVEMENT?

The quality and standards of the care

To improve the quality and standards of care further the registered person should take account of the following recommendation(s):

  • revise the policy for administering medication to ensure consent is sought for each medication and the medication record contains accurate details of what is being administered

  • ensure when completing risk assessments clear information is included as to how any identified risk or hazards, are to be minimised; within this record include prompt timescales for monitoring and review

  • revise the induction procedure to ensure that required elements, including child protection are shared with staff within the first week of employment; consider ways to monitor staff's understanding of these and other procedures through management monitoring system.

The quality and standards of the nursery education

To improve the quality and standards of nursery education further the registered person should take account of the following recommendation(s):

  • revise the planning systems and assessment so that the learning objectives and next steps for each child are clearly identified to ensure children are sufficiently challenged and plans make reference to the stepping stones

  • increase the opportunities for children to count and write for a purpose

  • consider ways of extending children's learning into the outdoor environment across all areas of learning.

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